SDIC 2012 Conference Schedule

Self-Defense Instructor's Conference

Oberlin College

Oberlin, OH

July 25-29, 2012

 

CEUS Available for Social Workers

 

Building a Sustainable Movement

Violence Prevention, Social Justice, and Self Care

 

Schedule
Wednesday July 25,2012
10:00 AM Conference Opening
with your SDIC Conference Coordinators and NWMAF Board Liasion
10:30 am Workshop #1: "Growing Peaceful Warriors: Best Practices for Working with Youth
with Guiliana Maria Stella Blasi, Olivia Bernandel-Huey, Mariana Martinez, and Alica Racquel

The Destiny Arts Center in Oakland, California, exists to end isolation, prejudice and violence in the lives of young people. DESTINY (De-Escalation Skills Training Inspiring Nonviolence in Youth) promotes a model of practical skill building and leadership development through awareness, de-escalation, conflict resolution, and self-defense. DESTINY provides after-school, weekend and summer programs for young people ages 3 - 18, both on its main site community arts center in North Oakland, and in over forty East Bay schools. Programs are specifically designed to reach youth of color and low-income youth. DESTINY believes in giving youth the opportunity to share the message of peace and empowerment through performances, events, workshops and teaching opportunities in the community. Youth instructors undergo continual training in the DESTINY 5 Fingers of Self-Defense curriculum as well as mentorship with caring adults as they reach out to other youth within the community as peers and teachers

In this workshop, presenters will share best practices for working with youth. These include: positive re-enforcement, authentic relationships, clear, consistent structure and expectations, and follow-through. In addition, we’ll also explore the role of opening and closing rituals, and the need to keeping things moving, with lots of activities to engage youth in learning. Maintaining a safe and tidy environment, or "soji" practice, facilitates learning, as does descriptive, as opposed to evaluative, praise and critique.

Course Objectives:
  • Learn practical strategies for teaching violence prevention through movement and music
  • Understand the power of interactive games and role-plays for teaching skills to youth
  • Practice specific de-escalation techniques
  • Discover ways to adapt curriculum for different ages

12:00

Lunch

2:00 pm

(90 min)

NASW:      1.5 CEUs

Workshop #2: “The 5 Fingers of Self-Defense: A Living Model of Feminist Empowerment”
with Koré Grate

In this workshop, explore the history and evolution of a feminist empowerment model for teaching self-defense. From its early beginnings on the East Coast, the 5 Fingers of Self-Defense began with classes to teach empowerment, both verbal and physical using - Mind, Voice, Escape, Fight and Tell. This model has grown and morphed and is widely recognized among women in the martial arts. The ways that this model has been shared and evolved over time includes dance, spoken word, and public demonstrations, and is a reflection of the ongoing creativity and collaboration that has been a hallmark of the feminist self-defense movement for more than 30 years. Like so many aspects of our training, much of our success relies on our willingness to move beyond individual ownership to create shared models of empowerment within community. As we experience a living timeline and see how different generations of women martial artists and self-defense teachers have made this model their own, we will come to truly appreciate what it means to hold the future of women’s self-defense in our hands. Lecture and demos. Open to everyone.

Course Objectives:

  • Understand the origins and development of The 5 Fingers of Self-Defense
  • Gain first-hand experience of tools and techniques based on The 5 Fingers
  • Explore skill-sharing as a cooperative model of learning and teaching
  • Identify ways self-defense curriculum can be adapted for different cultural contexts

4:00 pm

(90 min)

NASW:      1.5 CEUs

Workshop #3: "Intimate Partner Violence: Recognizing & Responding, Teaching & Healing"
 

Intimate partner violence (other terms include domestic violence, battering, abusive relationships, and dating violence) is present in all communities and affects all people.  As self-defense instructors, we must assume that many of our students, friends, colleagues, and partners have witnessed or experienced intimate relationships that are physically, sexually, economically and/or emotionally abusive, coercive and controlling.  This session will enhance our ability to recognize and respond to the tactics of perpetrators and the needs of survivors from a variety of social identity communities.  We’ll explore resources for teaching healthy relationship skills and discuss the challenges and opportunities of working with students who are being hurt.

Course Objectives:

  • Recognize core strategies and tactics of perpetrators of intimate partner violence and the impact these have on survivors
  • Identify community-specific elements of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV)
  • Share specific resources for teaching healthy relationship skills
  • Explore the opportunities and challenges of teaching self-defense and personal safety to students experiencing IPV

5:30

Dinner
 

7:00

(90 min)

NASW         1.5 CEU's Option 1 or 2      

Workshop #4:

1) "Practical Responses to Interpersonal Violence"

with Wendi Dragonfire

In this workshop, we will explore scenarios involving interpersonal violence and practice ways to deescalate verbally and physically, without being physically aggressive. For example, sometimes saying or doing something unexpected can distract or change the energy of a situation. We will learn how to position ourselves for safety and use resources in the environment to our advantage.  We all have life skills and experiences that can be translated into effective action.  The clearer you are about your own life principles the better able you are to communicate, and the less likely you are to be a target for someone's aggression.  The instructor’s personal life strategy is to be respectful, be polite, and use humor.  She reminds us that self-defense is 90% mental attitude and 10% physical technique. Understanding basic self-defense principles and having a range of reliable physical techniques can give you the confidence to interrupt violence early. 
Course Objectives:
  • Trust your instincts and avoid or diffuse situations before they escalate
  • Recognize signals of increasing aggressive tendencies
  • Develop verbal and physical skills to increase choices in violent confrontations
  • Practice responses that are active rather than reactive

OR

2) "Games for Self-Defense"

with Susannah MacKaye

Why play games in a self-defense class? There is a current of fear that underlies a self-defense class – how could it not? Self-defense training exists because of the threat of violence in our lives, both past and present.  Yet fear and anxiety interfere with learning. Games can help reduce fear and make the class a joyful and fun experience. Play is a way of rehearsing for reality. It allows us to practice different ways of responding. Games can help participants connect with each other, build trust, and manage emotions. Play helps rebalance the autonomic nervous system and promotes healing from trauma. Games shift energy and keep things moving. Familiar games create a sense of safety. Play creates resiliency. Games can be used to recycle/review concepts in interesting ways. Games can teach specific skills and help develop core competencies. The question really should be – “Why have a self-defense class without games?” This course will cover the value of games for teaching and healing and introduce a variety of useful games, appropriate for both children and adults.

 Course Objectives:

  • Play games designed to help group participants connect, build trust, and work together to solve problems
  • Explore the role of play in healing from trauma and creating/restoring resiliency
  • Learn how to develop games to support specific teaching goals
  • Adapt familiar games for self-defense, such as “Pin the Tool on the Target” and  “Ally Tag”

8:45 PM

Social Networking & Snacks
 
AND
 
Handout & Skill Swap
 
Join us for an exciting opportunity to network and share skills, activities and handouts with other self-defense teachers.
July 26, 2012
7:00 am

Breakfast

8:30 pm

(90 min)

NASW:      1.5 CEUs

Workshop #5: "Building a Sustainable Movement: Violence Prevention, Social Justice, & Self-Care…..  So When Am I Supposed to Sleep?"
 
Many women, survivors of violence, teachers, social workers and people who identify with oppressed communities find long-term, sustainable self-care to be a challenge.  And for good reasons!  Whether you are a seasoned self-care practitioner, or someone who hasn’t taken a day off in a decade, this presentation will help you to assess the current state of your self-care skills and strategies, as well as to explore any changes you would like to make.  We will be looking deeply into broad and meaningful definitions of care for ourselves (hint: it’s not pampering!) and the connection of self-care to sustainable social and community change.

Course Objectives:
  • Identify any areas of self-care in which you excel, and those you would like to change
  • Recognize barriers to sustainability in your own life, including the impacts of social injustice
  • Create self-care goals which are personally meaningful and measurable
  • Experience a guided meditation for progressive relaxation

10:30 am

(90 min)

NASW:      1.5 CEUs

Workshop #6: "Expanding Relationships with Culturally Diverse Communities"

Working with individuals and groups different than our own can be deeply rewarding on many levels. However, we may lack the cultural “attunement” or orientation to realize optimal results. Discover how possessing Cultural Intelligence, or “CQ”, can enhance your ability to relate to and truly engage with diverse audiences. When the effort to demonstrate "authentic" respect is perceived, even if not completely culturally correct, there tends to be an understanding that this action is in itself a risking of oneself, and the seeds of trust are sown. Learn from Rhonda Singer, one of Canada’s leading advocates of CQ, about its implications for business and health and safety education.

Previously, the common approach to cultural competency was teaching people about specific cultures and assuming that increased “head” knowledge would translate into sensitivity and effectiveness in intercultural contexts. In contrast, Rhonda’s work, based on the intelligences of IQ and EQ, predicts that a leader’s cultural intelligence is largely based on a personal capability rooted in the individual’s motivation, knowledge, strategy and behavior adaptability. Discover how this elegant and comprehensive framework can help you achieve success in your intercultural work. Karen Gray will share experiences and resources for working with First Nations communities in Canada. Facilitated by Heather Turnbull.

Course Objectives:

  • Gain insight into your own cultural intelligence (CQ)
  • Describe and apply the four capabilities of the CQ framework 
  • Distinguish between rule-based and relationship-based cultures
  • Strengthen relationships and build trust in multicultural interactions

12:00 am
Lunch
 

2:00 pm
(30 min)

SDIC Early Program Closing and Bridge to ST-SDIC

 

4:00 pm

ST-SDIC Camp Opening
 

5:30 pm

Dinner


 

7:30 pm

(90 min)

NASW:      1.5 CEUs

Workshop #7: "Uh, what do I say now? – Microaggressions and Intersecting Oppressions"

The moment of terrible realization arises. We encounter bigotry or prejudice of some kind. There is an awful sinking feeling and words get caught in our throat. Racism lurks, as perniciously as the social pressure to deny, minimize, over-identify or change the subject. Yet this is also an important opportunity to step up and stand up for what's right. We may find ourselves either lashing out or clamming up, with little good effect. Many of us have found that the best response seems to come to us long afterwards, when the opening has passed. It can be particularly challenging when the oppression comes in the form of a micro-aggression and when it comes from someone in authority - a teacher, a healthcare provider, a higher-ranking student. How can we name these subtle yet serious attacks, as forthrightly as we name physical abuse? How can we create a climate in which students feel comfortable challenging us and each other in the moment when micro-aggressions are happening? How can we protect ourselves when this kind of violence is directed towards us and remain present to help repair the damage when it was our own actions that had a negative impact or caused harm? Together, we will create some shared language to talk about our experiences. This workshop will provide insights, raise questions, and offer opportunities to practice effective tools and strategies so that we can bring our strongest selves to everyday peace-building.

Course Objectives:

  • Define micro-aggressions fueled by "isms" including racism, sexism and homophobia
  • Understand and articulate how various forms of oppression intersect
  • Identify personal strengths and challenges in dealing with conflict
  • Name four steps to respond effectively to the interpersonal violence of prejudice and bigotry
Friday July 27, 2012
7:30 am

Breakfast 

8:30 am
(90 min)


Workshop #8: "Online Marketing - Part 1"

As potential students or clients increasingly use the internet to find information, you need to ensure that your information is readily found.  In this workshop we will cover several ways to boost your online presence, including: making your website search-engine friendly as well as engaging to human readers, finding and using keywords in headers and text, using and tagging photos, using videos and YouTube, Google Places, Inbound and internal links and QR Codes and other off-line ways to drive traffic to your website.

Course Objectives:

  • Find words relevant to potential students as well as search engines
  • Learn to use those words effectively in a website to increase page ranking
  • Learn what not to do – actions that may lead to delisting from Google and other search engines
  • Develop offline activities to drive online traffic

10:30 am
(90 min)

NASW:      1.5 CEUs

Workshop #9: "Uh, what do I say now? – Microaggressions and Intersecting Oppressions"

See Workshop #7 for description.  May be taken as a second in this two part series or independently of the first class.
12:00 pm

Lunch

 

2:00 pm
(90 min)

NASW:      1.5 CEUs

"SDEMC 1 - Awareness: The Foundation of Self Defense"

Introduce basic principles of mindfulness to train your awareness, hone your intuition, and build a foundation for self care. Consider the “big picture” of violence and the larger socio-political-cultural context as it relates to all aspects of self-defense. Explore how cultural differences, violence against women, racism, and homophobia impact our self-image and influence our thoughts and actions towards others. What do we believe about ourselves and others? How do our beliefs and behaviors affect our safety and well-being? How do we navigate the world? How do we relate to our intuition?

Course Objectives:
  • Identify and apply basic principles of awareness
  • Learn how to assess ourselves, others, and our environment
  • Explore meditation as a tool for cultivating awareness and personal power
  • Learn to recognize and interrupt violence at an early stage

4:00 pm
(90 min)

NASW:      1.5 CEUs

"SDEMC 2 - Assertiveness and Boundary Setting"

with Christine Schoefer

This class helps us identify what gets in the way of assertiveness. We will look at our own patterns and our personal needs and perceived limitations. We will learn how to recognize and assess potential threats in different situations and practice responding to these non-verbally (through body language and eye contact) as well as verbally. Boundary-setting exercises and simple role plays will help us expand our understanding of assertiveness to include de-escalation, getting help and support, and being an ally to others.

 Course Objectives:

  • Learn to set clear boundaries using eyes, voice and body language.     
  • Practice defending boundaries, de-escalating conflict and preventing transgressions with role plays
  • Gain skills for responding to challenges and threats from strangers, colleagues, relatives and friends
  • Develop assertiveness skills for everyday life

5:30 pm

Dinner

7:00 pm
(90 min)

NASW:      1.5 CEUs

Workshop # 10: "Field and Office Safety Training for Social Service and Healthcare Providers"

with Clara Porter

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OHSA) ranks health care, including social work, as the third most violent profession in terms of workplace violence.  Participants will explore their responses to perceived threats and address how role, age, gender, trauma history, and others factors influence interactions with staff, clients, program participants.  We will discuss barriers to safety and day to day safety skills for use in the field, office and on home visits.  SDIC participants – Come learn to translate your self defense teaching to meet the needs of this growing class of professionals. 

 Course Objectives: 

  • Make safety assessments of locations and situations and develop a safety plan
  • Set and maintain clear boundaries with clients and program participants
  • Utilize assertive communication and de-escalation skills and somatic interventions to address inappropriate and potentially threatening client behavior
  • Practice simple and effective physical defense and containment skills

9:00 pm

Women's Martial Arts Conference Demonstration
 


Saturday July 28, 2012

7:30 am

Breakfast

8:30 am
(90 min)

Workshop # 11: "Moving from Self-Defense to 'Engagement'"

with Heather Turnbull

The time is right and audiences are ready for fresh approaches to sustainable change, whether in the business or health and safety environment (the 'rationale'). In fact, individual and organizational thinking now regards communication and human potential development - tenets of martial arts philosophy - as two of the key drivers of employee engagement (the 'how to').

Through a personal inventory of attitudes, knowledge and capabilities, you'll discover how your martial arts and self-defense training has unique value across many disciplines. By aligning your approach with the dynamics of the 'new' workplace, you'll learn to identify and leverage opportunities for personal and professional prosperity.

Course Objectives:

  • Increase awareness of personal strengths and skills and their value in the workplace
  • Explore ways martial arts practices can facilitate shifts in thinking and relating
  • Refine knowledge and know-how through discussion and group work
  • Identify key partners for collaboration and develop first steps

10:30 pm
(90 min)     NASW         1.5 CEU's


Workshop # 12: "Teaching Self-Defense in Higher Education Communities"

with Katy Mattingly, and a panel including Joanne Factor, Clara Porter, Deborah Schipper, and Christine Schoefer

This panel presentation features self-defense instructors who have taught a variety of self-defense workshops, classes, and programs in higher education, including colleges, universities, and community colleges.  Some issues of interest for those who teach in or wish to teach in higher education include:

  • Gender – How do we think about limitations on gender-restricted classes, as well as specified outreach to women and men, and to LGBT communities)?
  • Stakeholders – Challenges of community organizing with diverse sponsors, departments, and funders; the worlds of for-credit and non-credited classes.
  • Hook-up Culture – In some schools and for some students there has been a recent dramatic transformation from “dating” to “hook-up” culture; how do we assure our teaching strategies remain relevant and accessible?
  • Responding to Incidents – How can we be nimble and responsive when high profile crimes raise interest in self-defense, while also prioritizing long-term planning and realistic understanding of the dynamics of violence?
  • Policies – How might the Clery Act, the new Title IX guidance, and school specific Sexual Assault policies affect our work as self-defense instructors?

Panelists will share about their work in higher education and welcome questions from attendees. Moderated by Katy Mattingly.  Katy currently serves as the Chair of the Self-Defense Subcommittee of the Student Safety Work Group at the University of Michigan.

12:00 pm Lunch

2:00 pm
(90 min)


"SDEMC 3 - Physical Techniques"

When awareness and assertiveness do not deter an assailant and we cannot immediately get away, we have to employ physical techniques. In a context of safety and support, we will learn simple, efficient physical techniques (like palm heel, hammer fist, elbows strikes and basic kicks) that will cause pain and damage to an assailant. These effective techniques can be mastered without a martial arts background. The object is not to fight but to get away. We will discuss what might get in the way of actually using these techniques (fear of injury, fear of hurting someone else, etc.) as we awaken the fighting spirit within.

 Course Objectives:

  • Learn about a progression of an attack from verbal to physical       
  • Identify main weapons and targets on the body                           
  • Learn what makes techniques effective and find the ones that work best for you  
  • Practice basic strikes to build body memory and increase physical confidence

4:00 pm
(90 min)


"SDEMC 4 - Groundfighting, Grabs, and Chokes"

with Christine Schoefer

In this class, we address the fear of being taken to the ground. As we get comfortable playing, moving and defending ourselves on the mat, we will learn that the ground offers us a whole spectrum of effective techniques. We will expand our sense of what is possible in self defense: technique beats strength; spirit beats technique. Practice getting to the ground safely and getting back up again quickly. Partner practice will include keeping an attacker in check with legs and getting out of straddles, leg grabs and pins. We’ll also discuss the differences between defending against grabs and chokes and practice ways to get out of them from the front and from the back.

 Course Objectives:

  • Get comfortable defending ourselves from the ground                                                                          
  • Learn releases from grabs and chokes                                            
  • Adapt basic principles for use in different situations                                            
  • Expand the range of effective responses in self defense

OR

Workshop #13 "Online Marketing - Part 2"

with Joanne Factor

Content is Queen. For a website to keep the attention of potential students or clients, you need to offer them engaging and enticing (and even interactive) information.  You need to make that information readily findable. And you want to be able to see what users are looking at and how they are moving around your site.  In this session we’ll cover: organizing your website, identifying the main goal of your home page / landing page, generating content with Google Alerts and others’ blogs, based on what your visitors are looking for, using analytics and web logs to examine visitors’ behavior, and brand consistency.

Course Objectives:

  • Determine the purpose of your website
  • Determine if your website is fulfilling that purpose by looking at web analytics
  • Structure and add to your website to achieve desired goals

5:30 pm

Dinner
 
7:00 pm

NWMAF Member Meeting

8:45 pm

Bazaar and Social
Sunday July 29, 2012
7:30 am Breakfast

8:30 pm
(90 min)     NASW        1.5 CEUs



Workshop #14: " Introduction to Healing Touch Techniques"

with Wendi Dragonfire

In this workshop, you will be introduced to chakra and energy systems through the heart-centered practice of Healing Touch. Like martial arts, Healing Touch is a practice for body-mind-spirit. It cultivates mindful attention based on energy awareness to help a person ground and center and reestablish balance in daily life.  Healing Touch is based on the premise that all healing is self-healing.  The healer’s job is to facilitate - to help balance and harmonize energy so that the body can more effectively heal itself. We will pay special attention to how self-care practices can be used within a clinical or classroom setting. (Open to all levels of experience.  Note: Bring a notebook and pen for note-taking and an extra layer if you tend to get cold.)

 Course Objectives:

  • Learn a guided meditation to ground, center and prepare for healing
  • Get a brief introduction to the 7 major chakras
  • Learn a full body technique to balance and harmonize the flow of energy in the body
  • Explore simple energy healing techniques for everyday use

10:30 pm
(90 min)


Workshop #15: “Knife Disarms for Self-Defense Training”

with Koré Grate

Most women agree that dealing with any weapons in a self-defense situation is truly scary.

In this class, we will go over the principles of knife attacks and disarms. Repetition and practice of various situations is the goal to being able to stay calm in a case where a knife is being used to control or harm by “going to the places that scare us, to lead our life as warriors”- Pema Chodron. We also address the distancing aspect of a knife attack, whether the attacker is using the knife to hold/close range, or attacks from away/long range.

Participants should bring practice knives, and some will be available.  Open to everyone.

Course Objectives:

  • Learn how to deal with an attacker with a knife
  • Explore the distancing of attacks with a knife
  • Learn ways to disarm a knife attack
  • Understand and practice various attacks to reduce anxiety

12:00 pm

Lunch

 

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