Self-Defense Instruction Conference 2015 /Self-DEFENSE path
Schedule


Causeway Bay Hotel & Conference Center

Lansing MI

July 15 - 19, 2015


 

Also see the full ST-SDIC Camp Schedule


Register for ST-SDIC 2015

 

Wednesday July 15,2014
9:15 - 9:45 AM

SDIC Trainer Orientation, Meet and Greet

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Workshop #1: Allies and “Up Standers” 1: What are they? Can I be one? Part One

with Julie Harmon


As Self-Defense Instructors who explore the intersections of violence prevention and intervention “in community” we frequently invite our participants, explicitly or implicitly, to explore being an “ally”. Being an ally has a myriad of social and cognitive constructs. It can also have an embodied practice. The need for speaking up or stepping in often happens in a state of heightened adrenaline so we need to practice these skills the same way we practice our physical techniques. We will explore the embodiment of “allyness”, through physical practices and discussion. Participants will gain a somatic understanding of having an ally and moving as an ally on behalf of another. Partner practice and small group activities are designed to increase awareness of ourselves and to increase our ability to respond in present time. Ally practices build foundational skills that can help propel participants into “action”.


Course Objectives:

  • Explore the constructs that live in our bodies of what it means to be an ally
  • Experience the embodiment, or felt sense, of having an ally and being an ally
  • Gain awareness of your relationship to your body in situations of heightened adrenaline
  • Identify multiple social and emotional benefits of allyship

1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

Workshop #2:  Implicit Bias and Microaggressions: Self-Defense Strategies from the Perspective of Targets 

with Darlene DeFour

 

Unfair treatment and violence based on race, class, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity, ability and religion continue to be persistent parts of daily life for many people. Although overt, conscious, intentional maltreatment based on group membership continues to exist, even greater amounts of ill treatment is subtle and due to implicit, or unconscious bias that is repeated over time. Microaggressions are “brief, everyday exchanges that send denigrating messages to certain individuals because of their group membership.” Although these encounters may be brief, research shows that they negatively impact the health and quality of life for those targeted. How then can people who are targets of microaggressions manage and respond to them? In this session we will discuss microaggressions as a process, occurring within a social-historical context. As with other forms of violence, the context can determine how targets respond and influence their ability to get needed support services. What is the “microaggression process” for targets, from the experience of an actual event to its long-term, emotional, behavioral, and psychological consequences? Why are microaggressions sometimes difficult to recognize? What can we do to make them more visible? What are verbal strategies that people who are targeted can use to respond to microaggressions? What strategies might be used when seeking assistance and support?


Class Objectives:

 

  • Define and describe microaggressions and how they relate to health and safety
  • Develop an understanding of the “microaggression experience” as a process which has implications far beyond a specific event
  • Be able to explain why seemingly small events generate big reactions
  • Learn verbal strategies self-regulation skills to use yourself and to share with self-defense participants

-- OR -- 


Defending in the Dark:  Low-Vision Self-Defense

with Zosia Gorbaty

 

What if you had to defend yourself at night in an unlit environment, or someone blindfolded you, or threw something in your eyes? Are you prepared to defend yourself without being able to see your assailant?  How might these types of self-defense techniques benefit students who are blind or have low vision? This class will begin with exercises that will engage your other senses.  We will then practice several Zujitsu exercises adapted specifically for this type of training, including "Snake", "Shadow", and "Rolling off the Punch." Participants will practice blindfolded defense from grabs and strikes with their partners. Those who have taken this class say it is an "eye opening experience"!  Participants are requested to bring a blindfold or handkerchief.

 

Class Objectives:

 

  • Practice basic self-defense principles for low vision situations
  • Expand awareness via the use of senses beyond vision
  • Apply defensive strategies to grabs and strikes
  • Learn to trust your muscle memory and training
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Workshop #3: Self-Defense Sampler

with Anne Kuzminsky, Darlene DeFour, Zosia Gorbaty, Lauren Taylor and Jamie Zimron

 

Welcome to the Self-Defense Buffet! The workout will have a variety of stations to get your body moving and engage your mind. Think of it like a mini SDIC in one room, with seasoned self-defense instructors leading you through centering exercises, verbal responses, physical techniques and more. We will cover techniques to manage stress, the basics of de-escalation, ground-fighting and weapons defense.

6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

Workshop #4: Teaching Self-Defense to Students Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing and Working with ASL Interpreters

with Janet Heffernan and Abigail Whitney

 

This class will help participants understand some of the challenges and barriers Deaf participants (and to a lesser extent hard-of-hearing participants) are likely to experience in a standard martial arts or self-defense class. For example, in Martial Arts or Self-Defense classes, the emphasis is often on physical movement. Thus, any participant who is hoping to rely on lip-reading to pick up instruction techniques is not going to be able to do so easily unless the instructor stays within their sightline when giving verbal cues. We will explore ways an instructor can tailor their class instruction so that their modes of instruction are more accessible. This includes checking in with an interpreter ahead of time, asking a participant about needs and preferences, and paying attention to things like room set up, lighting, verbal pacing, etc. We will also discuss particular risk factors related to safety. This workshop will help with anyone interested in reaching out to the deaf and hard of hearing community develop some basic competency about how to adapt teaching to be more accessible and more relevant.

 

-- OR -- 


The Stress Management Component of Self-Defense

with Jamie Zimron


Self-Defense situations elicit fear and stress reactions very quickly. Mental clarity, emotional intelligence, and physical abilities may be enhanced or impaired by the flood of bio-chemicals and neuro-physiological changes that kick in when systems are challenged. It becomes very important to gain and train ways to productively manage our responses under circumstances of extreme stress. This class will delve into freeze, fight and flight; the Somatics of Stress & Emotion; and skills to calm our nervous systems so we can maximize function and minimize harm. Centering and calming practices will be shared to manage stress responses and enhance de-escalation techniques. In addition, Jamie will share from her experiences utilizing Aikido in Russia, the Middle East and Ethiopia as a vehicle to create new contact and goodwill between people locked in violent struggle. The Founder, Morihei Ueshiba O’Sensei, saw Aikido as ‘medicine for a sick world.’ And so we will contemplate a ‘Peace PE’ dimension to self-defense: Physical Education for both kids and adults to be able to embody peace, and to spread non-violent empowerment and conflict resolution practices. Appropriate for adults and teens.


Class Objectives

  • Better understand what stress is and how it affects us, particularly when experiencing danger or threat
  • Gain effective insights and skills to manage stress responses, and teach others, in order to be better equipped to handle self-defense situations
  • Practice ways to stay calm and centered as a way to reduce conflict
  • Look at ways martial practices are being used to enhance empowerment and peacemaking programs in the world
 8:15 PM - 9:00 PM
 SDIC Skillshare
Thursday July 16, 2014
 7:30 AM- 8:00 AM
 Morning Yoga
with Julie Greene
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Workshop #5: Teaching Martial Arts and Self-Defense for People with Physical Disabilities

with Janet Heffernan


There are a number of challenges facing martial arts and/or self-defense instructors when teaching people with different levels of physical abilities. Come to this workshop and gain a new understanding of how to help your students set goals and be successful in the martial arts or personal safety training. This class will give you some tools to adapt current curriculum and open up new possibilities for your students.


-- OR --


Teaching Physical Skills Efficiently and Effectively in Short Self-Defense Programs

with Nancy Lanoue

 

As instructors, most of us feel a tension around how much time to devote to what most people are expecting when they sign up for a self-defense program (how to fight off a stranger attacker) versus what statistics and life experience tells us people are more likely to need (awareness and verbal skills). At Thousand Waves, our various self-defense syllabi are so jam packed with topics like boundary setting, de-escalation, intervention, dealing with harassment and healthy relationships that we struggle to find the time to teach basic strikes, kicks, blocks, and escapes from holds. Experience shows us that these physical skills are the things most students are hungriest for, and I remember these being the most transformational to me when I took my first self-defense class almost 40 years ago. Our instructor team resolved to revitalize our teaching of physical skills to make sure we aren’t short-changing physical skills as we improve our coverage of non-physical material. We reviewed the strikes, kicks and defensive movements we teach and eliminated some, so that the ones we do cover are taught with more technical detail and drilled with more vigor. We also found ways to teach the same physical technique for multiple applications – as a strike, to gain a release from a hold, or to disarm an assailant with a weapon. This has greatly increased our efficiency because we can build on skills students already know when we move to a new section. Open to all levels, Adults & Teens, Medium Exertion

 

Course Objectives:

 

  • Practice multiple applications for a range of effective physical skills – including strikes, kicks, blocks, footwork, and releases from holds
  • Learn how to construct safe, dynamic drills and use space and other resources wisely
  • Consider what key pieces of feedback to provide students in order for them to develop physical competency
  • Improve verbal efficiency when giving instructions
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Workshop #6: Allies and “Up Standers” 2: What are they? Can I be one? Part Two

with Julie Harmon


This workshop will build on the experiences in Up Standers Part One, though you can attend Part 2 even if you missed Part 1. We will explore the constructs, risks, rewards and practices of being an “up stander’ in both private and public situations. Unlearning the cultural forces that have shaped some of our beliefs and behaviors takes time. Acting as an ally for others helps us build capacity for self-advocacy and social change. Everyone benefits from the practice of constructive action. Based on various concepts of Green Dot, participants will have the opportunity to practice steps, skills and styles of “Up Stander” behaviors through small-group discussions and demonstrations. Interventions will be both direct and indirect. The level of exertion will be low. Open to adults and teens.


Course Objectives:

  • Gain an understanding of the cognitive and emotional decision making involved in choosing to be an Up Stander
  • Examine the risks and rewards of various strategies
  • Practice 2-3 strategies involved in Up Stander behaviors
  • Build capacity to be an effective ally

-- OR --


Low-Force Self-Defense Solutions

with Lori O’Connell


There are a number different of contexts in which women might want to opt for lower level force solutions when defending themselves, whether it’s a social/work situation in which the aggressor doesn’t truly intend any harm, when the attacker is someone with whom they have a prior relationship and they can’t bring themselves to use brutal force, or perhaps it’s a bullying situation at a school with a zero-tolerance policy against violence. This course introduces you to a variety of low-level force solutions that can be used for self defense against many different types of attacks. In combination with verbal de-escalation/ boundary setting, you’ll learn effective defensive physical techniques that combine body protection tactics, structure-breaking escapes and pain compliance applications to provide low-level force solutions with minimal chance of causing serious or long-term injury while still being effective at gaining release from holds. All techniques are designed to be easy to learn and apply in 3 minutes or less. They can also be effectively combined with higher-level force techniques for situations when required. This class will be low exertion, open to all levels, adults, teens and YMA. Note: Please wear a jacket or thick shirt you don’t mind being grabbed (No zippers!)

 

Course Objectives:

  • Expand your range of self-defense solutions to include simple, low force techniques
  • Practice tactics for self-protection, to escape or to gain compliance
  • Learn easy and effective self-defense techniques not likely to cause injury
  • Be able to add higher-force techniques when needed
1:30 - 2:00 PM SDIC Early Program Closing

MAIN PROGRAM BEGINS

6:30 - 8:00 PM

Workshop #7: Empowerment Self Defense Model Course (ESDMC), Session 1: Creating Safer Spaces: Introduction to the Empowerment Model of Self-Defense

with Martha Thompson and Alena Schaim


With presentation, activities, and discussion, the first ESDMC session introduces a model of self-defense that (1) is trauma-informed and welcomes people of various life experiences; (2) addresses the realities of violence and self-defense that is rooted in an understanding of gender-based violence and its relationship to other types of violence; and (3) promotes self-defense and violence prevention education that has transformative potential. We will explore what is known about violence, including what gives rise to violence, who is at risk, who are perpetrators and how violence occurs. We will look at how messages about gender, race, class and other systems of inequality affect perpetrators choices about who to target and how people who are targeted may respond. The self-defense paradox will also be examined: perpetrators are responsible for violence but there are things we can to do to increase our safety without compromising our freedom. At the end of the class, new and experienced teachers will have the opportunity to reflect on the elements of empowerment-based self-defense, what contributes to creating a safe space, and ways to place self-defense within a social context. This class is low exertion, for all levels of experience, open to teens and adults.

Course Objectives:

  •  Identify elements that contribute to creating safer spaces
  • Experience and understand the benefits of a space where mental, emotional and physical safety are priorities
  • Outline the unique qualities of Empowerment Self-Defense
  • Understand how self-defense fits into a larger social context of violence and develop an approach to build stronger alliances within diverse communities
 8:30 - 10:00 PM
 

Film Screening


Out in the Night is a new documentary by blair dorosh-walther that examines the 2006 case of The New Jersey 4. Through the lives of four young women, Out in the Night reveals how their race, gender identity and sexuality became criminalized in the mainstream news media and criminal legal system. Under the neon lights in a gay-friendly neighborhood of New York City, four young African-American lesbians are violently and sexually threatened by a man on the street. The man verbally assaults them and threatens them when they resist verbally. Renata and Venice defend the group and a fight begins, captured by security cameras nearby. The man yanks out hair from Venice’s head and chokes Renata. Then, Patreese pulls a knife from her purse and swings at him. Strangers jump in to defend the women and the fight escalates. As the fight comes to an end, all get up and walk away. But 911 has been called and the man involved has been stabbed. Police swarm to the scene as their radios blast out warning of a gang attack. Three of the women plead guilty. But Renata, Patreese, Venice and friend Terrain claim their innocence. They are called a “Gang of Killer Lesbians” by the media. In activist circles they become known as The New Jersey 4. -- The screening of the film will be followed by a brief discussion. 


Appropriate for ages 13 and up.


Friday July 17, 2014
8:30 - 10:00 AM

Workshop #8: Why Can’t We Just Get Along?  A Nonviolent Approach to Conflict in Communities 

with Robin O’Brian

 

In school, at the gym, at work, in our neighborhoods, wherever we live, work and play there are numerous opportunities to determine which side of the fence we are on.  Sometimes this results in conflict. Would you like to see an alternative; a way to be yourself and not be in conflict with anyone else’s self? Can you imagine a world with no fences?  Then join me in an interactive, action packed demonstration of nonviolent communication at work and play! Nonviolent Communication asserts that needs are universal; all action is an attempt to meet human needs; needs are never in conflict, rather strategies to meet needs are at the source of all conflict.  This class offers a brief overview of nonviolent communication as it relates to needs and strategies and then quickly moves into an exploration of situations offered by participants. Class will be fueled by real life situations which might include topics of “bullying”, uncomfortable social interactions, conflicts with parents, teachers or other people in positions of authority, road rage, demands and pushy co-workers.  Objectives include sharing an overview of nonviolent communication and empathy, assessing physical safety, and exploring creative ways to connect and avoid conflict while maintaining a sense of self and authenticity. Workshop includes examples and handouts which can be used for reference later. For more info on NVC, visit: https://www.cnvc.org/ 

 

Course Objectives:

 

  • Explore nonviolence in an interactive, participant-driven, fun atmosphere
  • Gain an overview of nonviolent communication and the role empathy serves in reducing violence
  • Assess physical safety with awareness and an action plan
  • Find creative ways to relate to conflict without sacrificing personal integrity and authenticity

 

-- OR --

 

Teaching Martial Arts and Self-Defense for People with Developmental Disabilities

with Janet Heffernan


More and more professionals (doctors, psychologists, social workers and teachers) are recommending martial arts and self-defense for their clients who are dealing with developmental delay or ASD disorders ranging from Autism to Anxiety, from ADHD to Hypertonia (low muscle tone). This course will help you be ready and able to help these students succeed in your class. We will start with gaining an understanding of some of the most common disorders and diagnoses as well as terminology used. We will learn how to assess student strengths and limitations and adapt curriculum with this awareness in mind.  Then, we will work on drills to gain an understanding of what some of our students are facing. Finally, we will have a question and answer session and look at some examples from our dojos/classrooms and our teaching.

Course Objectives:

  • Identify the benefits of martial arts and self defense for students with developmental delays, Autism spectrum disorders or sensory challenges
  • Practice drills to assess and address student needs
  • Learn to modify curriculum to build on student strengths
  • Be able to adapt MA and SD techniques based on real-life examples
10:30 AM - Noon

Workshop #9: Empowerment Self Defense Model Course (ESDMC), Session 2: Physical Power and Self-Defense

with Martha Thompson and Alena Schaim


This session highlights the idea that finding the power in one’s own body and learning physical self-defense tools is critical to dismantling beliefs about the invincibility of the powerful and the inevitability of violence. Finding the power in one’s own body is critical to healing from violence, feeling grounded in the here and now, and finding one’s voice. We will practice simple tools including breath, stance, body language, yelling, evasion, getting to safety, strikes and kicks. This session will provide opportunities for participants to generate power with physical self-defense tools that are easy to learn, remember, and use. This approach will support people with a range of abilities to find their physical power and link physical techniques to an empowerment-based approach. We will address the empowerment self-defense paradox - highlighting how to use physical self-defense while emphasizing physical tools as tools of last resort. New and experienced self-defense instructors will have the opportunity to consider how to support students in generating physical power, framing physical tools as part of a larger toolbox, (as opposed to a formula) and promoting peaceful solutions to conflict.


Course Objectives:

  • Help students with a range of physical abilities connect to the power in their own bodies by practicing simple, physical tools
  • Place physical skills within a larger self-defense toolbox and identify how this approach differs from a prescribed formula
  • Demonstrate the tools in the “toolbox” in practical scenarios
  •  Identify language to address the complexities of teaching physical self-defense tools as tools of last resort and as a way to promote peaceful solutions to conflict

-- OR --


Confront the Shadow: Women’s Self Defense with a Padded Attacker

with Jaye Spiro

 

Suitable for the courageous beginner or the woman with self-defense training, this class offers the opportunity to strike full-force blows to a black-belt male who is completely padded.  The action-packed class empowers us by offering the opportunity to confront our worst fears in a supportive and supervised atmosphere.  After practicing a few very simple and effective strikes, each participant will apply these physical skills to scenarios in which she is grabbed and defends herself.  Two simultaneous sessions – limited to 12 participants each or 24 total.

 

Course Objectives:

  • Participate in the creation of a safe, supportive learning environment
  • Practice verbal assertiveness and yelling
  • Strike, kick and knee to pads successfully
  • Deliver full force blows to the padded male instructors

-- OR --


Acupressure for Self-Care

with Amelia Jones


Acupressure is a traditional Chinese bodywork technique based on the principles of acupuncture. In this class, participants will learn to locate and apply pressure to specific points for health maintenance, pain management, and the treatment of common ailments.

1:30 – 3 PM

Workshop #10: Exploring Best Practices for Trauma-Informed Teaching in Martial Arts and Self-Defense

with Johanna Hattendorf and Diane Long


Self-defense and martial arts can be a powerful means to heal from old traumas and to experience our bodies in new ways. In this workshop, we will provide concrete examples of ways to prevent and manage sensory triggers and sensory overwhelm that may occur when working with people who have experienced trauma. Events that happened in the past continue to affect the physiology, as if the threat was happening in present time. This affects a person’s sense of safety and interferes with the ability to process, organize, and respond to information. Examples of ways to modify learning environments include simple things like moving at a slower pace, breaking things down and offering a range of options for ways to participate. In the first part of class, we will explore how current theories in the field of trauma and recovery underscore the benefits of many of the core features of martial arts training and align with the values we promote in Empowerment Self-Defense. The second part of class will look at how Tai Chi can be used within an existing ESD curriculum to make it more trauma-sensitive. The last part of class will allow some time for skill sharing as a group.

Course Objectives:

  • Understand a wide range of self-protective responses and the impact of trauma on learning
  • Identify ways to more effectively predict and respond to triggers in the classroom setting
  • Increase confidence in your ability to adapt techniques from martial arts and apply them to trauma-informed teaching
  • Get a felt sense of how slowing things down and being more intentional can make learning easier

-- OR --

 

Confront the Shadow: Women’s Self Defense with a Padded Attacker

with Jaye Spiro

 

Suitable for the courageous beginner or the woman with self-defense training, this class offers the opportunity to strike full-force blows to a black-belt male who is completely padded.  The action-packed class empowers us by offering the opportunity to confront our worst fears in a supportive and supervised atmosphere.  After practicing a few very simple and effective strikes, each participant will apply these physical skills to scenarios in which she is grabbed and defends herself.  Two simultaneous sessions – limited to 12 participants each or 24 total.

 

Course Objectives:

  • Participate in the creation of a safe, supportive learning environment
  • Practice verbal assertiveness and yelling
  • Strike, kick and knee to pads successfully
  • Deliver full force blows to the padded male instructors
3:30 – 5:00 PM

Workshop #11: Empowerment Self Defense Model Course (ESDMC), Session 3: Setting and Maintaining Boundaries

with Martha Thompson and Alena Schaim


The focus of this session is on using one’s voice to set and maintain boundaries on behalf of one’s self and others. Through presentation and activities, we will discuss and practice setting and maintaining boundaries with awareness of self, the relationship, and the larger environment; recognizing and establishing safe distance; projecting confidence; reading body language; projecting consistency between body language, voice, and content of one’s message; varying volume, content, and tone; and managing emotions. As with physical self-defense tools, having the skills to set and maintain boundaries does not make a person responsible for the behavior of someone who violates those boundaries. Varied contexts will be explored, with attention to power dynamics, including teacher-student relationships. New and experienced self-defense teachers will have the opportunity to support people in finding their voice and model effective boundary setting exercises.


Course Objectives:

  • Identify activities to support people in finding power and confidence in their own voices
  • Model basic boundary-setting principles while projecting calmness and managing emotions
  • Maximize student practice of setting and maintaining boundaries in varied relationships and situations
  • Recognize power dynamics, including teacher-student relationships and develop more awareness of how to create safer environments
6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
 

Workshop #12: Women, Martial Arts, Self Defense and Mental Health

with Abigail Whitney


This is a discussion class allowing participants to share what it means to them to be a woman in a martial arts/self-defense environment. What impact has that had on their mental health journey? What was the 'hook' for them to get into this kind of training?  As a survivor and having had a life-long struggle with depression, I know how important my martial arts training has been/continues to be to my mental health. I intend to offer women a chance to come together to share tips, techniques and strategies that have allowed them to continue training OR have allowed them to facilitate others' success in this discipline. The intent is to allow instructors to develop a greater sensitivity to the needs of women with mental health struggles, allowing them to experience success as a martial artist.  This is accessible to all levels of experience, adults and teens.


Saturday July 18, 2014
8:30 – 10 AM

Workshop #13: Gender Diversity and Inclusion: A Presentation and Discussion

with NWMAF Members

 

In this workshop and discussion forum, we will talk about theories of gender, gender socialization, and how rigid gender roles contribute to violence. The discussion will help us identify the ways that homophobia and transphobia are weapons of sexism and part of ongoing gender-based violence. The workshop will also provide some baseline definitions and terminology to talk about gender identity, gender expression, assigned gender, sexual attraction, etc., to help us understand the differences between these things and how they connect. The discussion will have a broader frame than Trans 101 with a the desire to create more understanding about the barriers and risks transgender people and people who transgress gender norms face on a daily basis. Most women in martial arts and self-defense have had to overcome prejudice as a result of beliefs or behaviors that go against social norms. Training in Martial Arts and Empowerment Self Defense actively counters much of the social conditioning about what it means ti be a woman. Transgender women and gender nonconforming folks have been coming to camp throughout the years, but there is no formal policy of inclusion. How can we, as NWMAF members, take action to ensure that ST/SDIC is a safe, affirming place for all women and girls and others who train with us? Some friends and peers who were part of the women’s martial arts community for years and have since transitioned to male. How are our training spaces evolving to reflect and honor this growing diversity? We will have an opportunity to share information and best practices, share our hopes and concerns, educate ourselves, and explore our own relationships to gender as critical steps in understanding gender diversity and fostering spaces where people can access critical resources and feel a sense of safety and belonging.

 

-- AND/OR --

10:00 am – 12:00 PM

 

SPECIAL COMMUNITY CLASS!

 

Community Self-Defense Class

with Jaye Spiro

 

NWMAF will partner with Allen Neighborhood Center on the east side of Lansing to present a free Women’s Self Defense Workshop at their site.  Joan Nelson, a NWMAF founder and pioneer in assault prevention programs, now directs the Allen Neighborhood Center and is enthusiastically promoting this event.  The Allen Market Place, at 1629 E. Kalamazoo Street is home to a diverse and energetic local neighborhood, just east of the state capital.  They will open their doors at 9:30 AM for registration and light refreshments.  Running from 10 AM to noon, this fun and informative class teaches strategies for handling various attacks from verbal to life threatening.  Women sixteen and up of all sizes abilities and life experiences are welcome.   It is open to participants of ST and SDIC and YMA moms as well.  Experienced and novice self-defense instructors are encouraged to assist with this program.  With this class we continue to promote the NWMAF mission to provide for the safety of women in the local community. Jaye Spiro, a NWMAF Certified Self-Defense instructor and a team from Mejishi Martial Arts will coordinate the training. Note: Maps and directions to the offsite location will be available, (approximately a 10-minute drive).

 

Course Objectives:

  • ·      Identify risk factors and increase the ability to respond to potentially dangerous situations and behaviors
  • ·      Learn verbal and physical assertiveness skills
  • ·      Practice escape techniques with partners
  • ·      Employ last resort physical strikes with focus pads in combination with yelling
10:00 AM - Noon
 

 SPECIAL COMMUNITY CLASS!

 

Community Self-Defense Class

with Jaye Spiro

 

NWMAF will partner with Allen Neighborhood Center on the east side of Lansing to present a free Women’s Self Defense Workshop at their site.  Joan Nelson, a NWMAF founder and pioneer in assault prevention programs, now directs the Allen Neighborhood Center and is enthusiastically promoting this event.  The Allen Market Place, at 1629 E. Kalamazoo Street is home to a diverse and energetic local neighborhood, just east of the state capital.  They will open their doors at 9:30 AM for registration and light refreshments.  Running from 10 AM to noon, this fun and informative class teaches strategies for handling various attacks from verbal to life threatening.  Women sixteen and up of all sizes abilities and life experiences are welcome.   It is open to participants of ST and SDIC and YMA moms as well.  Experienced and novice self-defense instructors are encouraged to assist with this program.  With this class we continue to promote the NWMAF mission to provide for the safety of women in the local community. Jaye Spiro, a NWMAF Certified Self-Defense instructor and a team from Mejishi Martial Arts will coordinate the training. Note: Maps and directions to the offsite location will be available, (approximately a 10-minute drive).

 

Course Objectives:

  • Identify risk factors and increase the ability to respond to potentially dangerous situations and behaviors
  • Learn verbal and physical assertiveness skills
  • Practice escape techniques with partners
  • Employ last resort physical strikes with focus pads in combination with yelling
SUPER SATURDAY BEGINS HERE, CONTINUES THROUGH END OF SATURDAY
10:30 AM – Noon

Workshop #14:  Empowerment Self Defense Model Course (ESDMC), Session 4: Dating Violence: A Spectrum of Experiences and Responses

with Martha Thompson and Alena Schaim

 

Dating and interpersonal violence are risks for women and girls, with 1 out of every 3 experiencing dating or domestic violence in their lifetimes. This session will introduce new material and integrate material from prior sessions with a focus on exercises and activities that provide opportunities to assess, evaluate, and respond to a spectrum of dating violence situations. We will explore dating violence and self-defense tools in context including how to build healthy relationships, supportive and unsupportive language while interacting with a survivor, affirmative consent, and bystander intervention. We will identify some of the unique tools self-defense instructors have to offer in addressing dating violence, such as congruent body language, speaking up for oneself, intervening and the increased expectations that come with empowerment. New and experienced self-defense teachers will have the opportunity to reflect upon ways to aim to create a safe classroom for survivors of violence, to use what self-defense training has to offer for addressing dating violence, and to assess different ways for people to learn about healthy and unhealthy relationships.

Course Objectives:

  •  Explore models for teaching about healthy and unhealthy relationships and affirmative consent in relation to sexual violence
  •  Evaluate a spectrum of dating violence situations and identify possible responses from setting and maintaining boundaries to physical tools.
  • Identify unique skills self-defense instructors have to offer in addressing dating violence
  • Learn ways to create a more supportive classroom for people who have experienced abuse or assault
 
1:30 – 3 PM

Workshop # 15: But I Didn’t Mean It! Microaggressions from Multiple Perspectives

with Darlene DeFour

 

There is no such thing as objectivity. There is always a point of view. When we develop an understanding of microaggressions and the social-historical contexts in which they occur, both from the perspective of the aggressor and from the perspective of the receiver, it can assist us in learning how to combat them - to “unlearn” conditioned behavior and to upgrade our thinking and practice. When we begin to build awareness and recognize the typical emotions and reactions we might experience when accused of doing or saying something offensive or hurtful, we are better prepared to interrupt this cycle. This workshop will focus on microaggressions from the perspective of the “perpetrator” as well as bystanders. What are some helpful ways to respond when you have unwittingly committed an act that has been experienced as a microaggression? What can you do if you are witness to a microaggression? How might you intervene or interrupt a situation and how can you begin to do reparative work with others?


Course Objectives:

  • Understand microaggressions from multiple perspectives, particularly in the context of systemic, conditioned racism
  • Better recognize subtle examples of implicit bias and microaggressions
  • Identify typical reactions and defense mechanisms that occur when people are called out on microaggressions
  • Develop tools to interrupt the process and repair the damage when microaggressions happen
3:30 – 5 PM

Workshop #16: Empowerment Self Defense Model Course (ESDMC), Session 5: Self-Defense and Social Justice

with Martha Thompson and Alena Schaim


Through presentation, discussion, and activities, we will explore the possible ways that empowerment-based self-defense can expand people’s imagined possibilities for themselves and for others and how we can become social change agents individually and collectively right now. Participants will share self-defense stories, stories of transformation, and stories of community engagement. We will explore the relationship between self-defense, martial arts, self-defense, feminism, and social justice. We will discuss the importance of self-care and individual wellness practices. New and experienced self-defense instructors will have the opportunity to consider ways that they can connect themselves to other social justice movements for greater sustainability, for themselves and for their programs. We will reflect on what we have learned throughout ESDMC and identify next steps for our teaching and practice.


Course Objectives:

  • Articulate ways to link self-defense with other social movements and forms of resistance
  • Share personal and collective stories of transformation and lessons learned
  • Explore ways to maintain personal and collective well-being while doing the often difficult work of connecting with others in our communities


Sunday July 19, 2014
8:30 – 10:00 AM

Workshop #17: Embodied Practice - Out of Theory and Into the Body

with Johanna  Hattendorf and Diane Long


How do we create the conditions for healing, transformation, and growth when pain, injury or trauma is present? How do we help people begin to experience their bodies differently? Bodywork can help a person get a clearer sense of boundaries, personal needs and preferences and improve one’s ability to negotiate consent in all areas of life, whether in work or in personal relationships. Slow, gentle, experiential techniques drawn from craniosacral work, massage, mindfulness and somatic therapy increase our capacity to notice and feel subtle changes in the body, with attention to things like pace, pressure, and position. Cultivating this type of awareness allows us to better predict and manage stress or trauma triggers within our own bodies, while increasing the capacity for self-care and empathy. These are fundamental tools of awareness we can foster within the classroom setting. This course is designed as a complement to Trauma-Informed Teaching for Martial Arts and Self-Defense but can readily be taken alone. Note: There are a variety of ways to participate in class, either by direct experience or by observing. No prior experience with bodywork is needed.


Course Objectives:

  • Understand the critical role of intention in creating safe, supportive spaces
  • Gain a felt sense of support and the experience of being seen and heard through touch
  • Learn to recognize and respond to subtle shifts in your own body as a way to manage stress, mitigate trauma symptoms and improve self-care
  • Build vocabulary to describe the felt sense, particularly as it relates to preferences, wants and desires and use this as a template to teach embodied consent

 

© 2013-2015 National Women's Martial Arts Federation

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software